New to Factoring?

For those who aren't familiar with factoring, it is basically a fast way to get cash to run your business.

Factoring is Not a Loan

When you send your customers an invoice, they usually have 30 days to pay you back. Factoring companies will give you the bulk of the cash up front, sometimes within 24 hours, and collect the payments from your customers themselves. Once the invoices are paid in full, you’ll get the balance left over, minus a small fee.


Factoring Doesn't Require Debt

Sounds simple enough – fast cash for your business – no loans, no debt.

So how do you go about choosing the best factoring company?

Not all of them are created equal. Not all of them will give you the same level of service you need to help grow your business.

Everyone claims they have the simplest rate structure in the industry, no long-term contracts, same day funding, no up-front fees, no monthly minimums or maximums, fuel partnership programs for truckers, instant credit checks, etc., etc., etc.

We also offer these same benefits, but we GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU that other factoring companies don’t.

Here’s Why We Are The Factoring Company You Need For Your Business

No other factoring company matches our level of superior service and offerings.


As you can see, we simply have more to offer you.

Other factoring companies don’t even compare.
Memphis

And Not All Factoring Companies Can Say This:

More than half of our new business comes through client referrals.

So, Can Your Company Use Factoring?

Of Course! Companies of all sizes, from small privately-owned companies to large multi-national corporations, use factoring as a way to increase their cash flow. Factoring spans all industries, including trucking, transportation, manufacturing and distribution, textiles, oil and gas, staffing agencies and more.

Companies use the cash generated from factoring to pay for inventory, buy new equipment, add employees, expand operations—basically any expenses related to their business. Factoring allows a company to make quicker decisions and expand at a faster pace.

Unlike a bank loan, factoring has…

  • No principle or interest to pay over time
  • No debt to repay
  • Unlimited funding potential – no caps
  • Fast funding – no waiting months like at a bank
  • Approval is based on the strength of your clients, not your credit
  • Startups are welcome in using funding services

Some of the benefits you receive with factoring are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information for the city of Memphis

The city's central location has led to much of its business development. Located on the Mississippi River and intersected by five major freight railroads and two Interstate Highways, I 40 and I 55, Memphis is ideally located for commerce in the transportation and shipping industry. A third interstate, I 69, is under construction, and a fourth, I 22, has recently been designated from the former High Priority Corridor X. River barges are unloaded onto trucks and trains. The city is home to Memphis International Airport, the world's second busiest cargo airport (following Hong Kong), which serves as a primary hub for shipping.Memphis is the home of three Fortune 500 companies: , based in Nashville, has a factory in Memphis, near Beale St. and the The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis also has a branch in Memphis. , manufacturer of tissue products, operates the largest tissue manufacturing facility under one roof in the Memphis area.

 

The entertainment and film industries have discovered Memphis in recent years. Several major motion pictures, most of which were recruited and assisted by the , have been filmed in Memphis, was set in Memphis but filmed in Atlanta. The 1992 television movie Memphis, starring Memphis native , who also served as executive producer and writer, was also filmed in Memphis. The city lost , whose production was lured to Georgia, and, a television series on set in Memphis, was lured to Louisiana.

 

 

Information for the state of Tennessee

Although Tennessee is now primarily industrial, with most of its people residing in urban areas, many Tennesseans still derive their livelihood from the land. The state's leading crops are cotton, soybeans, and tobacco; cattle, dairy products, and hogs are also principal farm commodities. Tennessee's leading mineral, in dollar value, is stone; zinc ranks second (Tennessee leads the nation in its production). Industry is being continually diversified; the state's leading manufactures are chemicals and related products, foods, electrical machinery, primary metals, automobiles, textiles and apparel, and stone, clay, and glass items.

 

Aluminum production has been important since World War I. Tennessee has long been a major tourist destination, owing largely to its beautiful scenery. Many lakes were built here by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the Army Corps of Engineers. The TVA also developed the Land Between the Lakes, an enormous Kentucky-Tennessee recreation area. Visitors are also drawn by Tennessee's famed music capitals, the country-music mecca of Nashville and the blues and jazz hub of Memphis

 

You are about to be relieved of the stress and time consuming process of collecting on your accounts receivable.  

The main benefit of Trucking Factoring is that a business is not required to wait one or two months (sometimes more) for payment by a customer, the business will receive cash in hand to operate and grow their business. -Tennessee Trucking Factoring Companies

 

 

WANTED COMPANY TO BUY MY RECEIVABLES  

Tennessee Trucking Factoring Companies Articles

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""How a Factoring Company Saved This Owner of a Trucking Company Business""

 

Transportation industry plays a vital role in the economic scene. As people’s lives become more and more sophisticated as time goes by, making the most out of the limited resources is the concern of all. Say for example the proper use of land to get optimum profit and convenience or what is known as the zoning. It is defined as the process of planning for land use to allocate certain kinds of structures in certain areas. This method separates the manufacturing sites from the sources of its raw materials, the employees and employers to their respective offices. This made the transportation industry play a vital role in the economic scene. It is a primary necessity for businesses of any size and of any type. It does not just transport raw materials to the manufacturers but also bring finished products into our every door.

 

Investing in a business which plays a vital role in the current economic scene is a thing that every investor should not think twice about. But business does not work that easy. The big question is, how you are going to survive the most challenging phase of establishing a business – the start. Starting a business requires a capital. If you now have enough money for capital, you can now start your business and since you are investing in a very promising type of business, finding customers is not a problem. The problem is, what if you found bad ones. Even if your customers are also managing a business and expecting cashflow, which does not guarantee that they would pay you up to date because some businesses are just ill-managed. For the business to survive, the most important thing that you would be doing is funding your operational cost – make payrolls, fuel, maintenance - it should rely on cashflow, but since things like mentioned above is very common, some business owners would resort for a loan. But that does not solve the problem of getting your receivables paid on time. As a business owner, you cannot afford the time it takes to collect the receivables, while trying to make your business grow.

 

Mr. Paul, an owner of a small trucking company experienced the same kinds of problems and shared how he managed to survive. “I just released my head from the stress of how am I going to get my receivables, and focused on making the business grow…”

 

Mr. Paul just got his retirement fee from a big trucking company for almost forty years and was thinking on how to double his money in the shortest time possible. Seeing a small trucking company as a business of great potential and is a business that he knows. When he was still driving a truck, he was fascinated by how much money the company is making. He has also never experienced a delay in his salary. When he decided to invest his retirement fee in establishing a small trucking company, everything was just according to what he expected. He started with a single truck from his home. He started with just a few clients, the ones he knew already and never missed one deadline and kept freight damage as minimal as possible. Because of his outstanding services he started to get referrals and had more work than he can handle. From then, he started to expand, bought more trucks, hired more personnel. Using the knowledge he acquired from the company that he had served for a very long time, and dedication to his work, his little business grew in a rate that he had never imagined. The business is now requiring a more strategic plan and when Mr. Paul thought that everything was going very well, he encountered problems that he failed to foresee.

 

He had customers that made him wait for weeks or even months before paying. Since his little business is rapidly growing, his operational cost is also growing . This is a problem that he never knew and never observed in his entire career as a driver of a trucking company since he was never in an administration role. He was at the verge of breaking down, his business is losing money, growing too fast, not big enough has to rely cashflow to keep up to his fast growing business. He had to make his payroll, pay his suppliers, maintenance and fill his orders. Mr. Paul thought of going to bank and apply for a loan but was denied. “Maybe because I had a bad personal credit...haha”

 

Mr. Paul thought of declaring bankruptcy because of the stress that he never imagined he will be handling. He had to think of how to manage his business and at the same time, how will he keep the business alive by thinking of a solution on how is he going to deal with his receivables.

 

“You know that time, I, I, I just don’t know what to do... I felt that as the business kept growing and growing, I become more and more incompetent. Then suddenly, a hero came along... Just at the nick of time. “

 

Then a close friend of his introduced him to a factoring company and everything turned out just fine. So what is this factoring company then? What does it do? How did it save Mr. Paul’s business?

 

Well, this is how it works, Mr. Paul sells his invoices or receivables to a factoring company at a discount and not in an amount where he can no longer make a profit. The factoring company will then be the one collecting the invoices of Mr. Paul’s business from his customers. Say for example, Paul still has 100 dollars to collect from one of his customers. He then sells it to the factoring company at a lesser price, say 90 dollars. The factoring company will now be the one who is going to get the 100 dollars collectible from Paul’s customer.

 

The factoring company immediately gave Mr. Paul the cashflow he needed. He now has instant customer credit checks. He can rest well and likes doing business with companies that pay their bills on time. Save him from the stress of thinking how to deal with his collectibles, thus saving time and money. He can now focus on growing his business and keeping his customers happy. Increase his sales and cashflow.

 

The Factoring Company not just saved Mr. Paul’s start-up business but made it a big company now. It has helped Mr. Paul’s business, why don’t you let it help yours?

 

 

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You are about to be relieved of the stress and time consuming process of collecting on your accounts receivable.

 

 

Tennessee Trucking Factoring Companies Articles

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Medical and Healthcare Factoring

 

Receive Payment Today! No Waiting Weeks for Reimbursement!

 

It's certainly no secret that Medicaid, Medicare, HMOs, Workers' Compensation, and other private insurers can take a LONG time to pay your invoices! But now there's good news for healthcare professionals! Now you don't have to wait weeks, sometimes months, to collect on your medical receivables. If you're a healthcare professional and you provide medical or healthcare-related services of any type, we're here to help you!

 

The Difference between Healthcare Factoring and Medical Factoring

 

Healthcare factoring and medical factoring are phrases that are often used interchangeably, probably understandably, but there is a difference between these two. The difference is that healthcare factoring applies when there's no third party payer involved, while a medical factoring company is used when there is a third-party payer involved.

 

Healthcare Factoring and Medical Receivables Factoring are available for the following healthcare providers -

 

- Group and Sole Practitioners
- Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Facilities
- Hospitals
- Chiropractors
- Laboratories
- Durable Medical Equipment
- Medical Coding Services
- Medical Billing Services
- Medical Supply Companies
- Medical Staffing Companies
- Medical Transportation
- Medical Transcription Services
- Ambulance Providers
- Nursing Homes
- Imaging Facilities, such as providers of X-Rays, MRIs, CT Scans, and so on
- Home Healthcare Providers - both Medical and Non-Medical,
- And more!
Healthcare Receivables Factoring

 

Generally, healthcare receivables are associated with customers who are not third-party payers. Some common healthcare sectors include medical staffing companies, medical transcription services, medical billing and coding services, and medical supply companies. When these vendors utilize healthcare factoring they're free to enjoy the benefits of an almost unlimited line of credit - all based on the services they've provided. A simple explanation of factoring healthcare receivables is as follows-

 

- When work has been completed, the healthcare vendor will invoice their customer.
- These customers may include nursing homes, hospitals, medical offices, and so on.
- Next, the vendor will forward a copy of the billing documentation to the healthcare factoring company.
- Within 24 hours, sometimes even less, the factoring company will deposit money into the vendors bank account. The amount deposited will generally be around 85% of the gross value of the invoice.
- The factoring company handles collections on behalf of the vendor, and will retain 15% while awaiting payment.
- Once the invoice has been paid in full, the factor will release the 15% - less their factoring fee - back to the vendor.

 

Medical Receivables Factoring

 

- Regardless of whether you're billing Medicaid, Medicare, HMOs, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, or third-party insurance companies, we have the perfect factoring solution for you. When you start factoring your medical claims you'll achieve instant benefits by receiving upfront capital; while the factor may have to wait months for your customers to settle their accounts. A simple explanation of factoring medical claims is as follows-

 

- The healthcare provider submits claims to the third-party payer, as usual.
- A copy of completed paperwork is then submitted to the factoring company.
- Within 24 hours, sometimes even less, the factoring company will deposit money directly into the medical provider's bank account: the amount deposited will typically be around 85% of the net collectable value.
- Once the claim has been paid in full by the third-party payer, the factoring company will release the remaining 15% - less their factoring fee.

 

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Tennessee Trucking Factoring Companies Articles

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The Basics of Trucking Factoring

 

Whether you’re the owner of a 50-truck fleet or an independent owner/operator, we all know that controlling your cash flow is vitally important to growing your business. Perhaps like many business owners you’ve become pretty clever at making creative use of your credit cards, because it’s certainly preferable to going to your banker and begging for a business Line of Credit! Fortunately, there is another viable option for owner-operator businesses and small trucking fleets. The answer to the age-old cash flow problem is Freight Bill Factoring!

 

If Freight Bill Factoring is an unfamiliar term to you, then here’s a brief explanation:

 

Freight Bill Factoring is the simple process of assigning your unpaid freight invoices to a third-party company (factoring company) for an amount that’s less than you would receive if you were to bill your customer direct. The bonus of Freight Bill Factoring is that it enables you to get paid almost immediately upon completion of a run, thus giving you access to much-needed cash required for the day-to-day running of your business operations.

 

Here’s a step-by-step explanation of how Freight Bill Factoring, or Trucking Factoring, works :

 

Once you’ve booked a load, you immediately email or fax details about the load, your customer, and your rate confirmation to the factoring company;
The factoring company will quickly respond by advising if that particular customer has been approved for load factoring;
You pull the load;
When the load has been delivered, you email or fax your load-related documents, including the Bills of Lading, to the factoring company;
Within 24 hours the factoring company will make a direct deposit into your Comdata account or your bank account for the amount of approved charges: this could be anywhere between 60 and 90% of your billing;
Once the invoice has been paid by your customer, you’ll receive the balance.
It’s true that Freight Bill Factoring is not for everyone, but it is an ideal way of accessing the cash you need to provide stability to your trucking business and keep your wheels turning whilst you wait for your customers to pay their accounts.

 

Obviously, the best option for any business is to invoice your customers directly and wait to receive payment, but unfortunately many customers are painfully slow when it comes to paying their invoices. If you’re experiencing a cash flow problem, then working with a factoring company could well provide the financial cushion you need to keep your trucks on the road. It’s up to you to do your own research and determine whether factoring makes sense for your business. We trust that the information we’re providing here will provide you with enough knowledge to help you make a wise decision.

 

The Cost of Freight Bill Factoring

 

As explained above, there’s a cost involved with Freight Bill Factoring, and it’s up to you as the business owner to determine whether it’s worth the cost. The cost of Trucking Factoring can vary from as little as 1.5% up to around 5% of the line haul revenue.

 

You also need to be aware that there could be a number of fees, charges, and other expenses if you employ the services of a Freight Bill Factoring company. Generally, when you’ve assigned your Bills of Lading to a Trucking Factoring company, you’ll receive an immediate advance of between 60 and 90% of the anticipated revenue: of course, this figure will depend upon the factoring company you use. Once your customer has paid their invoice, the balance will be remitted to you.

 

It’s also important to note that all Freight Factoring companies are not equal, so here are some key questions a business owner should ask when considering hiring the services of a Trucking Factoring company:

 

Recourse or Non-Recourse: Which Freight Factoring Service Do You Provide?

 

You may not be familiar with these terms, but you need to be, because the ramifications of not understanding these terms could seriously affect the profitability of your business.

 

Recourse Factoring means that, should your customer fail to pay the factoring company, the factoring service can come back to you for reimbursement; while

 

Non-Recourse Factoring means that you have your money whether the invoice does or doesn’t get paid.

 

Will You Bill My Customer for All Future Loads or Can Factoring Be Done on a Load-by-Load Basis?

 

Let’s say you have a temporary cash shortfall problem that you’re trying to resolve by hiring the services of a Freight Factoring company: many businesses require that the factor handle all future collections owed to you by that specific customer. However, depending upon the customer, this may not be the path you wish to take. You should be aware, though, that some factoring companies are very rigid with this requirement.

 

There are Freight Bill Factoring services out there that allow you to choose on a load-by-load basis as to whether you’d like them to handle the collection on your behalf or whether you prefer to deal with the process of billing and payments yourself. And these services generally let you decide whether you want to receive payment when the invoice is actually paid or whether you want immediate payment. This can be very useful for small businesses because it can save a lot of time by allowing you to use the Freight Factoring service as a kind of de-facto billing service.

 

Is There a Price Difference If the Factoring Company Bills a Customer for All Loads Pulled?

 

Some Freight Factoring companies require that all billings originate through them, while others allow you to decide on an invoice-by-invoice basis whether you want the factoring company to do it, or whether you’d prefer to bill your customer yourself. If you choose to use their services on a spot-usage basis and choose not to have a certain invoice factored, you’ll probably still have to pay the $15-$20 billing charge. You’d then receive payment once the customer has settled their account.

 

Are Extra Fees Payable for Additional Services?

 

It’s not usual for a freight factoring company to automatically pay your customer’s invoices: they need assurance that your customer is a reliable, good-paying customer, so they’ll typically require a credit check to ensure they’ll be paid. Most Freight Factoring companies will arrange for a customer’s credit check on your behalf, and this credit check could incur a nominal fee. On the other hand, there are factoring companies out there that are happy to provide you with access to a list of customers that are already pre-approved – these are companies that currently meet the factor’s credit requirements. This can be very useful information to a trucking company, particularly if you need to know the credit rating of a prospective customer prior to booking a load.

 

How Much of the Freight Bill Do You Advance; and Do You Require a Deposit?

 

It’s very rare that a Freight Factoring service will advance 100% of your freight invoice, and that’s just one of the reasons why it’s imperative that you take the time to do your own research and find out what your chosen factoring company’s policy is. You also need to know if this will change from load to load or if the same policy applies to all your customers and all freight bills. p> 

Regarding deposits, some freight factoring services do require deposits, while others don’t. Again, before you finalize any contract with a Trucking Freight Factoring company, be very sure that you know exactly what you’re signing up for. p> 

 

"

 

You Can Find More Information at  http://transportationfactoringcompanies.org/
and at http://receivablesfunding.org

Call Us Today at: 1-866-593-2195

 

Watch our Factoring Company Video below to see how we work for you.

 

 


 

Get CASH NOW for your outstanding receivables.

 

 

Some history on the Freight Broker Industry

 

The Logistics and Transportation Industry in the United States

The logistics and transportation industry in the United States is highly competitive. By investing in this sector, multinational firms position themselves to better facilitate the flow of goods throughout the largest consumer market in the world.. International and domestic companies in this industry benefit from a highly skilled workforce and relatively low costs and regulatory burdens.

 

Shipping Port

 

Spending in the U.S. logistics and transportation industry totaled $1.33 trillion in 2012, and represented 8.5 percent of annual gross domestic product (GDP). Analysts expect industry investment to correlate with growth in the U.S. economy.

 

A highly integrated supply chain network in the United States links producers and consumers through multiple transportation modes, including air and express delivery services, freight rail, maritime transport, and truck transport. To serve customers efficiently, multinational and domestic firms provide tailored logistics and transportation solutions that ensure coordinated goods movement from origin to end user through each supply chain network segment. Industry Subsectors

 

Logistics services: This subsector includes inbound and outbound transportation management, fleet management, warehousing, materials handling, order fulfillment, logistics network design, inventory management, supply and demand planning, third-party logistics management, and other support services. Logistics services are involved at all levels in the planning and execution of the movement of goods.

 

Air and express delivery services (EDS): Firms offer expedited, time-sensitive, and end-to-end services for documents, small parcels, and high-value items. EDS firms also provide the export infrastructure for many exporters, particularly small and medium-sized businesses that cannot afford to operate their own supply chain.

 

Freight rail: High volumes of heavy cargo and products are transported long distances via the U.S. rail tracking network. Freight rail moves more than 70 percent of the coal, 58 percent of its raw metal ores, and more than 30 percent of its grain for the nation. This subsector accounted for approximately one third of all U.S. exports.

 

Maritime: This subsector includes carriers, seaports, terminals, and labor involved in the movement of cargo and passengers by water. Water transportation carries about 78 percent of U.S. exports by tonnage, via both foreign-flag and U.S.-flag carriers.

 

Trucking: Over-the-road transportation of cargo is provided by motor vehicles over short and medium distances. The American Trucking Associations reports that in 2012, trucks moved 9.4 billion tons of freight, or about 68.5 percent of all freight tonnage transported domestically. Motor carriers collected $642 billion in revenues, or about 81 percent of total revenue earned by all domestic transport modes.

 

Industry Associations:

 

American Association of Port Authorities
American Society of Transportation and Logistics
American Trucking Associations
Association of American Railroads
Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals
Express Delivery and Logistics Association
Industry Publications:

 

American Shipper
Journal of Commerce
Material Handling & Logistics
Transport Intelligence
Transport Topics

 

North American Industry Classification System For Transportation

 

The Transportation and Warehousing sector includes industries providing transportation of passengers and cargo, warehousing and storage for goods, scenic and sightseeing transportation, and support activities related to modes of transportation. Establishments in these industries use transportation equipment or transportation related facilities as a productive asset. The type of equipment depends on the mode of transportation. The modes of transportation are air, rail, water, road, and pipeline.

 

The Transportation and Warehousing sector distinguishes three basic types of activities: subsectors for each mode of transportation, a subsector for warehousing and storage, and a subsector for establishments providing support activities for transportation. In addition, there are subsectors for establishments that provide passenger transportation for scenic and sightseeing purposes, postal services, and courier services.

 

A separate subsector for support activities is established in the sector because, first, support activities for transportation are inherently multimodal, such as freight transportation arrangement, or have multimodal aspects. Secondly, there are production process similarities among the support activity industries.

 

One of the support activities identified in the support activity subsector is the routine repair and maintenance of transportation equipment (e.g., aircraft at an airport, railroad rolling stock at a railroad terminal, or ships at a harbor or port facility). Such establishments do not perform complete overhauling or rebuilding of transportation equipment (i.e., periodic restoration of transportation equipment to original design specifications) or transportation equipment conversion (i.e., major modification to systems). An establishment that primarily performs factory (or shipyard) overhauls, rebuilding, or conversions of aircraft, railroad rolling stock, or a ship is classified in Subsector 336, Transportation Equipment Manufacturing according to the type of equipment.

 

Many of the establishments in this sector often operate on networks, with physical facilities, labor forces, and equipment spread over an extensive geographic area.

 

Truck Transportation

 

Industries in the Truck Transportation subsector provide over-the-road transportation of cargo using motor vehicles, such as trucks and tractor trailers. The subsector is subdivided into general freight trucking and specialized freight trucking. This distinction reflects differences in equipment used, type of load carried, scheduling, terminal, and other networking services. General freight transportation establishments handle a wide variety of general commodities, generally palletized, and transported in a container or van trailer. Specialized freight transportation is the transportation of cargo that, because of size, weight, shape, or other inherent characteristics require specialized equipment for transportation.

 

Each of these industry groups is further subdivided based on distance traveled. Local trucking establishments primarily carry goods within a single metropolitan area and its adjacent nonurban areas. Long distance trucking establishments carry goods between metropolitan areas.

 

The Specialized Freight Trucking industry group includes a separate industry for Used Household and Office Goods Moving. The household and office goods movers are separated because of the substantial network of establishments that has developed to deal with local and long-distance moving and the associated storage. In this area, the same establishment provides both local and long-distance services, while other specialized freight establishments generally limit their services to either local or long-distance hauling.

 

General Freight Trucking

 

This industry group comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing general freight trucking. General freight establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized, and transported in a container or van trailer. The establishments of this industry group provide a combination of the following network activities: local pickup, local sorting and terminal operations, line-haul, destination sorting and terminal operations, and local delivery.

 

General Freight Trucking, Local

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local general freight trucking. General freight establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized and transported in a container or van trailer. Local general freight trucking establishments usually provide trucking within a metropolitan area which may cross state lines. Generally the trips are same-day return.

 

General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance general freight trucking. General freight establishments handle a wide variety of commodities, generally palletized and transported in a container or van trailer. Long-distance general freight trucking establishments usually provide trucking between metropolitan areas which may cross North American country borders. Included in this industry are establishments operating as truckload (TL) or less than truckload (LTL) carriers.

 

General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance, Truckload

 

This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance general freight truckload (TL) trucking. These long-distance general freight truckload carrier establishments provide full truck movement of freight from origin to destination. The shipment of freight on a truck is characterized as a full single load not combined with other shipments.

 

General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance, Less Than Truckload

 

This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance, general freight, less than truckload (LTL) trucking. LTL carriage is characterized as multiple shipments combined onto a single truck for multiple deliveries within a network. These establishments are generally characterized by the following network activities: local pickup, local sorting and terminal operations, line-haul, destination sorting and terminal operations, and local delivery.

 

Specialized Freight Trucking

 

This industry group comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local or long-distance specialized freight trucking. The establishments of this industry are primarily engaged in the transportation of freight which, because of size, weight, shape, or other inherent characteristics, requires specialized equipment, such as flatbeds, tankers, or refrigerated trailers. This industry includes the transportation of used household, institutional, and commercial furniture and equipment.

 

Used Household and Office Goods Moving

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing local or long-distance trucking of used household, used institutional, or used commercial furniture and equipment. Incidental packing and storage activities are often provided by these establishments. Specialized Freight (except Used Goods) Trucking, Local

 

Specialized Freight (except Used Goods) Trucking, Long-Distance

 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing long-distance specialized trucking. These establishments provide trucking between metropolitan areas that may cross North American country borders.

 

Freight Broker

 

A freight broker is an individual or company that serves as a liaison between another individual or company that needs shipping services and an authorized motor carrier. Though a freight broker plays an important role in the movement of cargo, the broker doesn't function as a shipper or a carrier. To operate as a freight broker, a business or individual must obtain a license from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). Freight brokers are required to carry surety bonds as well.

 

Freight broker services are valuable to both shippers and motor carriers. Freight brokers help shippers find reliable carriers that might otherwise be difficult to locate. They assist motor carriers in filling their trucks and earning money for transporting a wide variety of items. For their efforts, freight brokers earn commissions.

 

Freight brokers use their knowledge of the shipping industry and technological resources to help shippers and carriers accomplish their goals. Many companies find the services provided by freight brokers indispensable. In fact, some companies hire brokers to coordinate all of their shipping needs.

 

Often, freight brokers are confused with forwarders. Though a freight forwarder performs some of the same tasks as a freight broker, the two are not the same. A forwarder takes possession of the items being shipped, consolidates smaller shipments, and arranges for the transportation of the consolidated shipments. By contrast, a freight broker never takes possession of items being shipped thus in the absence of negligent entrustment, a freight broker is not normally involved as a party litigant in a cargo claim dispute, although as an accommodation, the freight broker may assist the shipper at their request and expense with filing freight claims.

 

NAICS Index Description

 

484110 Bulk mail truck transportation, contract, local
484110 Container trucking services, local
484110 General freight trucking, local
484110 Motor freight carrier, general, local
484110 Transfer (trucking) services, general freight, local
484110 Trucking, general freight, local
484121 Bulk mail truck transportation, contract, long-distance (TL)
484121 Container trucking services, long-distance (TL)
484121 General freight trucking, long-distance, truckload (TL)
484121 Motor freight carrier, general, long-distance, truckload (TL)
484121 Trucking, general freight, long-distance, truckload (TL)
484122 General freight trucking, long-distance, less-than-truckload (LTL)
484122 LTL (less-than-truckload) long-distance freight trucking
484122 Motor freight carrier, general, long-distance, less-than-truckload (LTL)
484122 Trucking, general freight, long-distance, less-than-truckload (LTL)
484210 Furniture moving, used
484210 Motor freight carrier, used household goods
484210 Trucking used household, office, or institutional furniture and equipment
484210 Used household and office goods moving
484210 Van lines, moving and storage services
484220 Agricultural products trucking, local
484220 Automobile carrier trucking, local
484220 Boat hauling, truck, local
484220 Bulk liquids trucking, local
484220 Coal hauling, truck, local
484220 Dry bulk trucking (except garbage collection, garbage hauling), local
484220 Dump trucking (e.g., gravel, sand, top soil)
484220 Farm products hauling, local
484220 Flatbed trucking, local
484220 Grain hauling, local
484220 Gravel hauling, local
484220 Livestock trucking, local
484220 Log hauling, local
484220 Milk hauling, local
484220 Mobile home towing services, local
484220 Refrigerated products trucking, local
484220 Rubbish hauling without collection or disposal, truck, local
484220 Sand hauling, local
484220 Tanker trucking (e.g., chemical, juice, milk, petroleum), local
484220 Top-soil hauling, local
484220 Tracked vehicle freight transportation, local
484220 Trucking, specialized freight (except used goods), local
484230 Automobile carrier trucking, long-distance
484230 Boat hauling, truck, long-distance
484230 Bulk liquids trucking, long-distance
484230 Dry bulk carrier, truck, long-distance
484230 Farm products trucking, long-distance
484230 Flatbed trucking, long-distance
484230 Forest products trucking, long-distance
484230 Grain hauling, long-distance
484230 Gravel hauling, long-distance
484230 Livestock trucking, long-distance
484230 Log hauling, long-distance
484230 Mobile home towing services, long-distance
484230 Radioactive waste hauling, long-distance
484230 Recyclable material hauling, long-distance
484230 Refrigerated products trucking, long-distance
484230 Refuse hauling, long-distance
484230 Rubbish hauling without collection or disposal, truck, long-distance
484230 Sand hauling, long-distance
484230 Tanker trucking (e.g., chemical, juice, milk, petroleum), long-distance
484230 Tracked vehicle freight transportation, long-distance
484230 Trash hauling, long-distance
484230 Trucking, specialized freight (except used goods), long-distance
484230 Waste hauling, hazardous, long-distance
484230 Waste hauling, nonhazardous, long-distance

 

Economic Impact of Trucking

 

The importance of trucking can summed up by an old industry addage: "If you bought it, a truck brought it." Retail stores, hospitals, gas stations, garbage disposal, construction sites, banks, and even a clean water supply depends entirely upon trucks to distribute vital cargo. Even before a product reaches store shelves, the raw materials and other stages of production materials that go into manufacturing any given product are moved by trucks.

 

Trucking is vitally important to U.S. industry, however, measuring the impact of trucking on the economy is more difficult, because trucking services are so intertwined with all sectors of the economy. According to the measurable share of the economy that trucking represents, the industry directly contributes about 5 percent to the gross domestic product annually. In addition, the industry plays a critical support role for other transportation modes and for other sectors of the economy such as the resource, manufacturing, construction, and wholesale and retail trade industries

Third Party Logistics-Freight Brokers 

Freight Brokers

 

Freight brokers are federally regulated and bonded companies. Most commonly they have a vast network and access to a library of freight carriers and search for the right availability based on customer specifications. These brokers also offer various value-added services that encompass transportation, logistics, and distribution. Typically, freight brokers do not touch the freight. They engage in helping shippers find the best price with the best carrier for any given load.

 

The proliferation of freight brokers called for an increase in financial integrity and liability of these companies, which has led to the passing of the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act. In order to obtain a license to broker freight, a freight brokerage must purchase a surety bond or trust agreement with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Prior to June 2012 when the bill was signed by President Obama, the surety bond coverage required to hold a broker license was $10,000. Effective October 1, 2013, the surety bond requirement increased to $75,000.

 

Other logistics companies include 3rd-Party Logistics Providers. They offer a variety of supply chain and distribution-related practices and techniques in order to improve in-house logistics. The main difference between a traditional freight broker and most 3rd-Party Logistics Providers is that freight brokers do not actually touch the freight, whereas 3rd-Party Logistics providers often do.

 

 

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